What is a roller bandage?

This roller bandage is made of cotton, gauze, elasticated fabric, or linen and is wrapped around the injured part of the body in spiral turns. There are three main types of roller bandages.

A bandage may be a strip of gauze or cotton material prepared during a roll. Roller bandages are often wont to immobilize injured body parts (sprains and torn muscles), provide pressure to regulate internal or external bleeding, absorb drainage, and secure dressings.

What are the general guidelines for applying a roller bandage?

  • Open-weave bandages are used to hold dressings in place. Because of their loose weave, they allow good ventilation, but they cannot be used to exert direct pressure on the wound to control bleeding or to provide support to joints.

  • Self-adhesive support bandages are used to support muscle land joint injuries and do not need pins or clips,

  • Crepe bandages are used to give firm, even support to injured joints.

How do you anchor a roller bandage?

Apply the roller gauze slightly distal to the dressing and make an entire wrap around the limb folding an inner corner back onto itself. Then wrap around the limb again, covering that folded corner which helps to stabilize and anchor the bandage in place.

There are several ways to fasten the end of a roller bandage. Safety pins or adhesive tape are usually included in first aid kits. Same bandage packs may contain bandage clips. If you do not have any of these, a simple tuck should keep the bandage end in place.

ADHESIVE TAPE

roller bandage  ADHESIVE TAPE

The ends of bandages can be folded under and then stuck down with small strips of adhesive tape.

BANDAGE CLIP

roller bandages BANDAGE CLIP

Metal clips are sometimes supplied with crape roller bandages for securing the ends.

TUCKING IN THE END

roller bandages TUCKING IN THE END

If you have no fastening. secure the bandage bypassing the end around the limb once and tucking it in.

SAFETY PIN

roller bandages SAFETY PIN
roller bandages

These pins can secure all types of roller bandages. Fold the end of the bandage under, then put your finger under the bandage to prevent injury as you insert the pin (right). Make sure that. once fastened, the pin lies flat (far right).

How to choosing correct size of roller bandage?

Before applying a roller bandage, check that it is tightly rolled and of a suitable width for the injured area. Small areas such as fingers require narrow bandages of approximately 2,5cm (l in) wide, while wider bandages of 10-15cm (4-6in) are more suitable for large areas such as legs. It is better for a roller bandage to be too wide than too narrow.

Smaller sizes may be needed for a child.

APPLYING A ROLLER BANDAGE

Follow the general rules below when applying a roller bandage to an injury.

  • Keep the rolled part of the bandage (the head) uppermost as you work. The unrolled short end is called the “tail”.

  • Position yourself in front of the casualty, on the injured side.

  • Support the injured part while you apply the bandage.

  1. Place the tail of the bandage below the injury. Working from the inside Of the limb outwards, make two straight turns with the bandage to anchor the tail in place.
roller bandages  Place the tail

2. Wind the bandage in spiraling turns working from the inner to the outer side of the limb and work up the limb. Cover one-half to two-thirds of the previous layer of bandage with each new turn.

roller bandages

3. Finish with one straight turn. If the bandage is too short, apply another one in the same way so that the injured area is covered.

roller bandages

4. Secure the end of the bandage, then check the circulation beyond the bandage If necessary, unroll the bandage until the blood supply returns, and reapply it more loosely. Recheck every ten minutes.

roller bandages

How to apply “roller bandages” on elbows and Knees?

Roller bandages can be used on elbows and Knees to support soft tissue injuries such as strains “0” sprains.

To ensure that there is effective support. flex the joint slightly, then apply the bandage in figure-of-eight turns rather than the standard spiraling turns. Work from the inside to the outside of the upper surface of the joint.

Extend the bandaging far enough on either side of the joint to exert an even pressure.

  1. Support the injured limb in a comfortable position for the casualty, with the joint partially flexed. Place the tail of the bandage on the inner side of the joint. Pass the bandage over and around to the outside of the joint. Make one-and-a-half turns, so that the tail end of the bandage is fixed and the joint is covered.
roller bandages

2. Pass the bandage to the inner side of the limb. just above the joint. Make a turn around the limb, covering the upper half Of the bandage from the first turn.

3. Pass the bandage from the inner side of the upper limb to just below the joint. Make One diagonal turn below the elbow joint to cover the lower half of the bandaging from the first straight turn.

roller bandages

4. A Continue to bandage diagonally above and below the joint in a figure of eight. Increase the bandaged area by covering about two-thirds of the previous turn with each new layer.

5. To finish bandaging the joint, make two straight turns around the limb, then secure the end of the bandage Check the circulation beyond the bandage as soon as you have finished, then recheck every ten minutes. If necessary unroll the bandage and reapply more loosely.

roller bandages clip

How to apply “Hand Bandage”

  1. A roller bandage may be applied to hold dressings in place on a hand or to support a wrist in soft tissue injuries. A support bandage should extend well beyond the injury site to provide pressure over the whole of the injured area.
Hand Bandage

2. Place the tail of the bandage on the inner side of the wrist, by the base of the thumb. Make two straight turns around the wrist.

Hand Bandage

3. Working from the inner side of the wrist. pass the bandage diagonally across the back of the hand to the nail of the little finger, and across the front of the casualty’s fingers.

Hand Bandage

4. Pass the bandage diagonally across the back of the hand to the outer side of the wrist. Take the bandage under the wrist. Then repeat the diagonal over the back of the hand.

Hand Bandage

5. Repeat the sequence of figure-of-eight turns. Extend the bandaging by covering about two-thirds of the bandage from the previous turn with each new layer. When the hand is completely covered, finish with two straight turns around the wrist.

6. Secure the end. as soon as you have finished. check the circulation beyond the bandage, then recheck every ten minutes. If necessary, unroll the bandage until the blood supply returns and reapply it more loosely.

TUBULAR GAUZE BANDAGES

These bandages are rolls of seamless, tubular fabric. The tubular gauze bandage is used with a special applicator which is supplied with the bandage. It is suitable for holding dressings in place on a finger or toe, but not to control bleeding.

  1. Cut a piece of tubular gauze about two-and-a-half times the length of the injured finger. Push the whole length of the tubular gauze onto the applicator. then gently slide the applicator over the casualty’s finger.
TUBULAR GAUZE BANDAGES

2. Holding the end of the gauze on the finger, pull the applicator slightly beyond the fingertip to leave a gauze layer on the finger. Twist the applicator twice to seal the bandage over the end of the finger.

TUBULAR GAUZE BANDAGES

3. While still holding the gauze at the base of the finger. gently push the applicator back over the finger to apply a second layer of gauze. Once the gauze has been applied, remove the applicator from the finger.

TUBULAR GAUZE BANDAGES

4. Secure the gauze at the base of the finger with adhesive tape. Check the circulation to the finger immediately and then again, every ten minutes. Ask the casualty if the finger feels cold or tingly. If it does. remove the gauze and reapply it more loosely.

TUBULAR GAUZE BANDAGES

TRIANGULAR BANDAGES

TRIANGULAR BANDAGE

This type of bandage may be supplied in a sterile pack as part of a first aid kit. You can also make one by cutting or folding a square meter of sturdy fabric (such as linen or calico] diagonally in half. The bandage can be used in the following three ways.

  • Folded as a broad-fold bandage or narrow-fold bandage (below) to immobilise and support a limb or to secure a splint or bulky dressing.

  • Opened to form a sling, or to hold a hand foot, or scalp dressing in place.

MAKING A BROAD-FOLD BANDAGE

TRIANGULAR BANDAGES


Open out a triangular bandage and lay it flat on a clean surface. Fold the bandage in half horizontally, so that the point of the triangle touches the center of the base.

Fold the bandage in half again in the same direction, so that the first folded edge touches the base. The bandage should now form a broad strip

MAKING A NARROW-FOLD BANDAGE

TRIANGULAR BANDAGES

Fold a triangular bandage to make a broad fold bandage.

Fold the bandage horizontally in half again. It should form a long, narrow, thick strip of material.

STORING A TRIANGULAR BANDAGE

Keep triangular bandages in their packs so that they remain sterile until you need them. Alternatively, fold them as shown [right] so that they are ready folded for use as a pad or bandage, or can be shaken open.

  1. Start by folding the I triangle into a narrow-fold bandage (above). Bring the two ends of the bandage into the center.
TRIANGULAR BANDAGES

2. Continue folding the ends into the center until the bandage is a convenient size for storing. Keep the bandage in a dry place.

TRIANGULAR BANDAGES

What are the REEF KNOTS?

When securing a triangular bandage always use a reef knot. It is secure and will not slip, it is easy to untie and it lies flat, so it is more comfortable for the casualty. Avoid tying the knot around or directly over the injury, since this may cause discomfort.

TYING AND UNTYING A REEF KNOT

  1. Pass the left end of the bandage (dark) over and under the right end light.
REEF KNOTS

2. Lift both ends of the bandage above the rest of the material.

REEF KNOTS

3. Pass the end in your right hand (dark) over and under the left end (light).

REEF KNOTS

4. Pull the ends to tighten the knot, then tuck them under the bandage.

REEF KNOTS

UNTYING A REEF KNOT

REEF KNOTS

Pull one end and one piece of bandage from the same side of the knot firmly so that the piece? of bandage straightens. Hold the knot and pull the straightened end through it.

HAND AND FOOT COVER

An open triangular bandage can be used to hold a dressing in place on a hand or foot. but it will not provide enough pressure to control bleeding. The method for covering a hand (right) can also be used for afoot, with the bandage ends tied at the ankle.

  1. Lay the bandage flat. Place the casualty’s hand On the bandage, fingers towards the point. Fold the point over the hand.
HAND AND FOOT COVER

2. Cross the ends over the hand, then pass the ends around the wrist in opposite directions. Tie the ends in a reef knot (above).

HAND AND FOOT COVER

3. Pull the point gently to tighten the bandage. Fold the point up over the knot and tuck it in.

HAND AND FOOT COVER

ARM SLING

An arm sling holds the forearm in a slightly raised or horizontal position. It provides support for an injured upper arm, wrist or forearm, on a casualty whose elbow can be bent or to immobilize the arm for a rib fracture An elevation sling is used to keep the forearm and hand raised in a higher position.

  1. Ensure that the injured arm is supported with the hand slightly higher than the elbow. Fold the base of the bandage under to form ahem. Place the bandage with the base parallel to the casualty’s body and level with his little fingernail. Slide the upper end under the injured arm and pull it around the neck to the opposite shoulder.
ARM SLING

2. Fold the lower end of the bandage up over the forearm and bring it to meet the upper end at the shoulder.

ARM SLING

3. Tie a reef knot (opposite) on the injured side, at the hollow above the casualty’s collar bone. Tuck both free ends of the bandage under the knot to pad it. Adjust the sling so that the front edge supports the hand, it should extend to the top of the casualty’s little finger.

ARM SLING

4. Hold the point of the bandage beyond the elbow and twist it until the fabric fits the elbow snugly. then tuck it in. Alternatively, if you have a safety pin, fold the fabric and fasten it to the front.

ARM SLING

5. As soon as you have finished, check the circulation in the fingers. Recheck every ten minutes. If necessary. loosen and reapply the bandages and sling.

ARM SLING

ELEVATION SLING

This form of sling supports the forearm and hand in a raised position. with the fingertips touching the casualty’s shoulder, In this way, an elevation sling helps to control bleeding from wounds in the forearm or hand. to minimize swelling. An elevation sling is also used to support the arm in the case of shoulder injuries.

  1. Ask the casualty to support his injured arm across his chest, with the fingers resting on the opposite shoulder.
ELEVATION SLING

2. Place the bandage over his body. with one end over the uninjured shoulder. Hold the point just beyond his elbow.

ELEVATION SLING

3. Ask the casualty to let go of his injured arm. Tuck the base of the bandage under his hand. forearm and elbow.

ELEVATION SLING

4. Bring the lower end of the bandage up diagonally across his back, to meet the Other end at his shoulder.

ELEVATION SLING

5. Tie the ends in a reef knot at the hollow above the casualty’s collar bone. Tuck the ends under the knot to pad it.

ELEVATION SLING

6. Twist the point until the bandage fits closely around the casualty’s elbow. Tuck the point in just above his elbow to secure it. If you have a safety pin, fold the fabric over the elbow and fasten the point at the corner. Check the circulation in the thumb every ten minutes loosen and reapply if necessary.

ELEVATION SLING

IMPROVISED SLINGS

If you need to support a casualty’s injured arm but do not have a triangular bandage available, you can make a sling by using a square meter (just over one square yard) of any strong cloth You can also improvise by using an item of the casualty’s clothing (below). Check circulation after applying for support and recheck every ten minutes.

JACKET CORNER

IMPROVISED SLINGS

Undo the casualty’s jacket. Fold the lower edge on the injured side up over his arm. Secure the corner of the hem to the jacket breast with a large safety pin. Tuck and pin the excess material closely around the elbow.

BUTTON-UP JACKET

BUTTON-UP JACKET

Undo one button of a jacket or coat [or waistcoat). Place the hand of the injured arm inside the garment at the gap formed by the unfastened button. Advise the casualty to rest his wrist on the button just beneath the gap.

LONG-SLEEVED SHIRT

LONG-SLEEVED SHIRT

Lay the injured arm across the casualty’s chest. Pin the cuff of the sleeve to the breast of the shirt, To improvise an elevation sling (opposite). pin the sleeve at the casualty’s opposite shoulder. to keep her, arm raised.

BELT OR THIN GARMENT

BELT OR THIN GARMENT

Use a belt. a tie or a pair of braces or tights to make a “collar-and-cuff” support. Fasten the item to form a loop. Place it over the casualty’s head. then twist it once to form a smaller loop at the front. Place the casualty’s hand into the loop.

Now we look what are the questions people having.

People also ask: Q&A

Q. What is a bandage and types of bandages?

A. The four main sorts of bandages are gauze, compression, triangular, and tube. The bandages made from cloth or from paper, are exceptionally versatile. All Safety Products sells several sorts of bandages like medical gauze, shoe covers, bandages, and other sorts of disposable medical supplies online.

Q. What happens if you put a bandage too tightly?

A. When a pressure bandage is wrapped around an extremity too tightly, it becomes a tourniquet. The blood supply to the arteries is cut off by a tourniquet.

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